unbekannter Gast

Monastery of the patriarchate of Peć#

Edited by Marija Šegan and Danijela Pantelić

The Monastery Complex of Peć or Peja Peja, Serbia is located at the entrance to Rugova Canyon, in the municipality of Peć. It presents the seat and mausoleum of the Serbian archbishops and patriarchs. It is assumed that the first church of the monastery complex was built in the 13th century by the Archbishop Arsenije I (d. 1266). The church was dedicated to the Holy Apostles, and it was painted for the first time in 1260 (it was painted again in the 14th and in the 17th century). In the 14th century, on the north of the Church of the Holy Apostles, the Church of St. Demetrius was built by the Archbishop Nikodim (1321–1324), and on the south of the Church of the Holy Apostles, the Church of the Holy Virgin and the Church of St. Nicholas were built by the Archbishop Danilo II (1324–1337).

Churches
The Churches of the Monastery of the Holy Virgin. Photo: Dragan Radovanović, 2009
Photo made available by Mathematical Institute SANU, Belgrade, under CC BY-SA 3.0

Churches
The Churches of the Monastery of the Holy Virgin. Photo: Dragan Radovanović, 2009
Photo made available by Mathematical Institute SANU, Belgrade, under CC BY-SA 3.0

The Church of Holy Virgin was painted in the first half of the 14th century, and the narthex of the church was painted again in the 16th century. The Church of St. Nicholas was painted in 1673/4 by the painter called Radul. The monastery is on а permanent conservation, and in 2006 it was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Fresco
A fresco of Jesus Christ. Photo: Dragan Radovanović, 2009
Photo made available by Mathematical Institute SANU, Belgrade, under CC BY-SA 3.0

Holy Mother
The Holy Mother of god. Photo: Dragan Radovanović, 2009
Photo made available by Mathematical Institute SANU, Belgrade, under CC BY-SA 3.0
Iconostasis
The Iconostasis of the Church of the Holy Apostles - the royal doors. Photo: Dragan Radovanović, 2009
Photo made available by Mathematical Institute SANU, Belgrade, under CC BY-SA 3.0

Sources:#

  • Đurić V.J., Ćirković S., & Korać V. (1990). Pećka patrijaršija. Beograd