Jacopo Strada and Cultural Patronage at the Imperial CourtThe Antique as Innovation, Band 1

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Metadaten und Beschreibung

Titel
Jacopo Strada and Cultural Patronage at the Imperial Court
Untertitel
The Antique as Innovation
Band
1
Autor
Dirk Jacob Jansen
Verlag
Brill
Ort
Leiden
Datum
2019
Sprache
englisch
Lizenz
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
ISBN
978-90-04-35949-9
Abmessungen
15.8 x 24.1 cm
Seiten
572
Kategorien
Biographien
Kunst und Kultur

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Inhaltsverzeichnis

  1. Preface XV
  2. Acknowledgements XVIII
  3. Acknowledgments of Financial Support Received XXI
  4. List of Abbreviations XXII
  5. Introduction: The Image‚ÄĒOr from Whom (Not?) to Buy a Second-Hand Car 1
    1. 0.1 The Portraits of Jacopo and Ottavio Strada 1
    2. 0.2 Why are These Portraits so Special? 4
    3. 0.3 Motions of the Mind 4
    4. 0.4 What is Known About Strada: Early Notices 9
    5. 0.5 Quellenkunde: Some Sources Published in the NineteenthCentury 15
    6. 0.6 Kulturgeschichte before World War II 19
    7. 0.7 Romance: Josef Sv√°tek and the Rudolfine Legend 21
    8. 0.8 A (Very) Modest Place in the History of Classical Scholarship 24
    9. 0.9 Contemporary Scholarship 25
    10. 0.10 What Has Not Been Written on Jacopo Strada 37
    11. 0.11 Weaving the Strands Together: The Purpose of this Study 39
  6. 1 Early Years: Family Background, Education, Giulio Romano 45
    1. 1.1 Family Background 45
    2. 1.2 Mantua and the Gonzaga 50
    3. 1.3 Formal Education 54
    4. 1.4 Artistic Training 57
    5. 1.5 Giulio’s Collections 60
    6. 1.6 Early Training as a Goldsmith? 63
    7. 1.7 Significance of his Mantuan Background for Strada’sDevelopment 65
  7. 2 Travel: Rome, Landshut, Nuremberg‚ÄĒStrada‚Äôs Connection withWenzel Jamnitzer 67
    1. 2.1 Early Travels 67
    2. 2.2 Residence in Germany 69
    3. 2.3 The Landshut Hypothesis 71
    4. 2.4 Romance in Franconia: Strada’s Marriage and his Settling in Nuremberg 79
    5. 2.5 Strada and Wenzel Jamnitzer 83
  8. 3 In Hans Jakob Fuggers’s Service 107
    1. 3.1 Hans Jakob Fugger 107
    2. 3.2 Fugger as a Patron and Collector 114
    3. 3.3 Fugger’s Employment of Strada 121
    4. 3.4 Architectural Patronage for the Fuggers: The DonauwörthStudiolo 134
    5. 3.5 Strada’s Trips to Lyon 137
    6. 3.6 Strada’s Contacts in Lyon: Sebastiano Serlio 149
    7. 3.7 Civis Romanus: Strada’s Sojourn in Rome 156
    8. 3.8 Commissions and Purchases: The Genesis of Strada’s Musaeum 174
    9. 3.9 Departure from Rome 183
  9. 4 Antiquario Della Sacra Cesarea Maesta: Strada’s Tasksat Court 188
    1. 4.1 Looking for Patronage: Strada’s Arrival at the ImperialCourt 188
    2. 4.2 The Controversy with Wolfgang Lazius 200
    3. 4.3 ‚ÄėObwol Ir.Maj. den Strada selbst dier Zeit wol zu geprauchen‚Äô: Strada‚Äôs Tasks at Court 210
    4. 4.4 Indirect Sources Throwing Light on Strada’s Employment at Court 242
    5. 4.5 Conclusion 248
    6. 5 Jacopo Strada as an Imperial Architect: Background 251
    7. 5.1 Introduction: The Austrian Habsburgs as Patrons of Architecture 251
    8. 5.2 The Prince as Architect: Ferdinand I and Maximilian II asAmateurs and Patrons of Architecture 255
    9. 5.3 ‚ÄėAdeste Musae‚Äô: Maximilian‚Äôs Hunting Lodge and Garden in the Prater 290
    10. 5.4 The Imperial Residence: Status quo at Strada’s Arrival 307
    11. 5.5 The Architectural Infrastructure at the Imperial Court 319
    12. 5.6 Strada’s Competence as an Architect 331
  10. 6 Strada’s Role in Projects Initiated by Emperor Ferdinand I 339
    1. 6.1 The Hofspital 340
    2. 6.2 The Tomb of Maximilian I in Innsbruck 343
    3. 6.3 Interior Decoration 350
    4. 6.4 The Tanzhaus 352
    5. 6.5 The Stallburg 355
  11. 7 An Object Lesson: Strada’s House in Vienna 367
  12. 8 The Munich Antiquarium 383
    1. 8.1 The Commission 383
    2. 8.2 The Design of 1568 391
    3. 8.3 The Concept 393
    4. 8.4 Strada’s Project: The Drawings 398
    5. 8.5 Strada’s Project: The Building 401
    6. 8.6 The Interior Elevation 407
    7. 8.7 The Exterior Elevation and its Models 411
    8. 8.8 Conclusion: Strada’s Role in the Creation of the Antiquarium 421
  13. 9 The Neugebäude 430
    1. 9.1 The Tomb of Ferdinand I and Anna in Prague; Licinio’s Paintings in Pressburg 431
    2. 9.2 Kaiserebersdorf and Katterburg 432
    3. 9.3 Sobriety versus Conspicuous Consumption 437
    4. 9.4 Hans Jakob Fugger’s Letter 438
    5. 9.5 Description of the Complex 441
    6. 9.6 The Personal Involvement of Emperor Maximilian II 455
    7. 9.7 Ottoman Influence? 463
    8. 9.8 Classical Sources: Roman Castrametatio and the Fortified Palace of Diocletian at Split 467
    9. 9.9 Classical Sources: Monuments of Ancient Rome 480
    10. 9.10 Contemporary Italian Architecture 489
    11. 9.11 Strada’s Contribution 500
    12. 9.12 Conclusion: Strada’s Role in the Design of the Neugebäude 507
  14. 10 Other Patrons of Architecture 514
    1. 10.1 The Courtyard of the Landhaus in Graz 514
    2. 10.2 The Residence for Archduke Ernest 517
    3. 10.3 Other Patrons: Vil√©m z RoŇĺmberk 520
    4. 10.4 Jan ҆embera ńĆernohorsk√Ĺ z Boskovic and BuńćoviceCastle 524
    5. 10.5 Christoph von Teuffenbach: The House in Vienna and the Castle at Drnholec 530
    6. 10.6 Reichard Strein von Schwarzenau and the Castle at Schwarzenau 534
    7. 10.7 Conclusion 542